Posts Tagged ‘social monitoring’

Passing Employer’s “Background Check”

April 13, 2010

 My mom e-mailed me this article: Employers monitor your social networking profile.  More and more companies are spying on their employees as how much time they spend in the social web whether it’s on Facebook or Twitter. Companies are also watching carefully the content on their employees’ profile.   This is reality, especially for students and job seekers.

 Just like a portfolio or an interview,  a person’s character says it all.  Even though an employee might be outstanding in their career, they have to be careful on how they conduct themselves outside the professional world.  For example, I am aware of what I say on Facebook , what I post, and what images are on my profile. It doesn’t make much sense for me to prepare a professional portfolio, resume, and go to various conferences to further my public relations career if my social profile content isn’t professional or appropriate to share with potential employers.

Outside of work, student organizations, and class, you still represent those organizations. What you say and post on your Facebook Profile or Twitter represents those groups as well.  Companies today are realizing that.  As a result, companies are taking matters into their own hands by spying on their employees using a new software called Social Sentry.  Social Sentry is a software that can track a person’s social web use only on Facebook and Twitter, but will also track use on LinkedIn, YouTube, and MySpace in the future.

How does this pertain to me is what you’re asking right? Well it pertains to you in so many ways.  One way is the time a person spends on Facebook by updating their status throughout the day making it seem like they do not have anything else to do besides “play” on Facebook. As a result, it doesn’t look good on the employer’s side. Here are a few questions to ask yourself to make your profile more appropriate:

  • if you have to question a photo, don’t upload it or tag yourself
  • What groups are you associated with on Facebook? Will your mom be proud of these groups?
  • What type of language is on your profile?
  • if you were asked in an interview to log into your Facebook, would you be ashamed?

You never know who’s checking your profile or using Google to search for you. Companies aren’t just using the traditional background checks. They are using the social web to their advantage to conduct their background checks as well: Will you pass the background check? If not, companies may dismiss or fire employees due to their social web profile content and behavior.

Behind the Scenes of Social Media

March 30, 2010

    Being able to collaborate social media and traditional  public relation skills  is one task  that public relations students need to carry out and bring to the table since that is what public relation agencies, companies, and organizations are looking for today, according to Co-Founder and President of Palette Public Relations Inc., Martin Waxman. Throughout the interview ( an-interview-with-martin-waxman), Waxman discusses the importance of traditional PR, life in the PR agency, and the digital footprints that are taking place.

      Integrating social media strategies is the biggest challenge Waxman faces with his clients because clients have to know their target audience ( who they want to reach) and what type of community are they part of, which are all traditional public relation strategies. Understanding how to use social  media tools is just as important as the company has to understand their target audience. For example, just because your target audience is using Twitter, doesn’t mean the company has a deep understanding of their target audience and are able to use Twitter in one day effectively to reach their target audience. With various social media tools that are available, you (the client/company) have to understand what social media sites stand for, the purpose of the site, and most importantly,   how people are utilizing the social media tools and are communicating to each other.

      Not only do you have to knowledgeable of how to use various social media tools, but students and future public relation practitioners must  have   a general understanding of the major communication bloggers, who  the top communication people are, and stay current in what’s happening within the social media world.  For example, even though I follow @paullyoung, @Peter Shankman, @chrisbrogan (just to name a few), I must know what they are discussing, how they communicate/”tweet”, and what  type of professional work they do or have accomplished and not having them just as followers.  Also, after completing a social media monitoring report, I am now aware of what types of social monitoring sites are available. However, just knowing and having a general knowledge of those sites won’t effectively help me know how to use the sites. I have to explain which site to use and why, which has been an interview question.

     Three vital characteristics that his company were founded  upon are simplicity, energy, and integrity.  In other words, simplicity meaning to make it easier for both his clients and for his agency. He won’t give up on his clients until he or his clients get results, which defines energy.  Out of all these qualities that Waxman founded his agency upon, I believe that the last one “integrity’ is the most important quality, especially today.  According to Waxman, “integrity” is being up front and honest with your clients. Having integrity is essential in becoming more transparent in social media.  ” When we started agency, media relations at our core” said Waxman.

Work Dynamics Changing due to Social Media

February 26, 2010

Work today consists of utilizing social media to engage with customers through blogs, react to their comments via Twitter, and to market the company through Facebook.  As I become more of a “social media junkie,” the“Social Media: Friend or Foe?” podcast  made me think about how  social media is changing the way people work in offices and at home. 

Employees can  use their personal Facebook and Twitter accounts to  ask their friends/followers for ideas and tools they’ve used before to help them with their current work strategies. Also, workers are able to have their Twitter followers “retweet” their questions and as a result, receive links, posts, and discussion boards to help them with their projects.For example, I am planning a kids’ fashion show charitable event for C.A.S.A (Court Appointed Special Advocates) and my Facebook status was “I need fashion show “themes” & titles for a kids’ fashion show..any suggestions?! I asked on Twitter if anyone had any kids fashion theme ideas while I was in the office. I was working utilizing the Internet to create ideas and search how others planned a fashion show. Employees aren’t wasting time on Facebook, Twitter, or on various blog site on the time clocks. What they are doing now is asking their friends or followers ideas, advice, and solutions to problems that others can help them with. This is how people are working today and it’s certainly proper as long as employees are actually working and  not using the Internet for personal purposes. 

Social media is becoming the “customer feedback/suggestion box,” which is where social monitoring comes into play. Company employees  can use social monitoring sites such as  Addcitomatic, IceRocket, Samepoint, Social Mentionpostrank,along with social media monitoring tools such as  tweetgrid, Twazzup, trendistic, to discover what is being said  about their company in a real-time format. So, if there is negative feedback about a new product launched, companies can immediately respond to their customers with solutions to the problem. Even though employees may not seem like they are working or doing their job because they are using the Internet for company purposes doesn’t mean that they aren’t working effectively; it’s just another way of how work is being complete and accomplished outside of the internal company offices.

Who knew that social media and the Web2.0 would have such a major impact on the  future of working?