Posts Tagged ‘current events’

To Big To Fail: Tiger Woods Guest Blog: Brittany Cook

April 19, 2010

Advertisements are only successful and profitable if people and the target audience react to the advertisements whether it’s a Super Bowl Ad, billboard ad, or on You Tube.   Brittany Maree’s blog   discusses how Nike uses public relations to promote Tiger’s image before the controversy we all are aware of.  Nike took a risk in creating an advertisement that causes controversy and reaction among the American public and from people globally. Because Tiger Woods is well-known around the world among sports and non sports fans for his natural golf talent and skill, Nike knew they had to capture the public’s eye using a public relations technique so that anti-Tiger Woods fans would not boycott the brand. 

Isn’t advertisements goal is to catch your eye creating a reaction from you as a consumer? This is what Nike did successfully. Nike promoted their product with their sponsor Tiger Woods in a  creative profound way. How does this advertisement influence other products Tiger Woods sponsors?

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Twitter Benefits: You Should Have Them Too

February 25, 2010

Barbara Nixon discusses why she requires her students to take part in utilizing Twitter http://publicrelationsmatters.com/2010/02/24/10-5-ways-for-pr-students-to-get-the-most-out-of-twitter/.  I didn’t even know what  Twitter was or how to use it “properly” and “professionally,” until Barbara Nixon came along to tell us why we should use Twitter.  I’ve been an active user on Twitter for almost a year now(@Leh1185 ) and I love it!

Why do I love Twitter and why is it  beneficial to students? Here’s my story and maybe this will persuade more Public Relation students to use Twitter other than class requirements. I began using Twitter without having any knowledge of how to present myself on Twitter, who to follow, and what do people “tweet” about. Then, I began to follow my technological savvy professor (@barbarnixon) who follows various professionals in all areas of public relations. This is where my REAL story began. I began to follow the “prestigious” Twitter users and responded to their tweets even though they didn’t then respond to mine (or even know I existed). But, the more I responded, the more responses I received from them.

For the first time I thought to myself  Wow they responded to me! Why me (out of all people)?! These professionals still respond to me because I am active on Twitter without being required to do so. I also ask professional questions and general advice to them. For example, my “tweet” the other day said this: to all PR Pros: When job searching, should you have ring backs?  Not only did I get many responses from professionals, but they told me “good ?.”  The more questions I asked the more they could see how interested I really am in learning about anything from professionalism to being a team player to preparing for the “real world work force.”

As a result of being transparent on Twitter, I developed “connections” with these professionals, which is why I love Twitter and other social media tools. Now, they follow me (wahoo!) and know that I exist and not just another Twitter user. In other words, I stand out by being genuine, professional, and having a sense of humor. Some of them I now talk to not only on Twitter, but on Facebook and even Skype, which lead to exchange numbers. I’m not the most outstanding student, but I take what I learn from my professors and implement them without being told. From there, I ask other professors about various assignments, topics, and general discussions.

Being active on Twitter shows others that you are willing to try new technological advances and are open-minded, which goes along with the old saying “you never know until you try.” For me trying out Twitter was all about asking myself “why is Nixon teaching us Twitter when we should be educated on PR writing?” Let me experiment with Twitter until I give myself an answer to this question. Once I gave Twitter a try, I expressed my gratitude to Nixon and told her this: now, I know why you want us to use social media.

Students: You need to be well-rounded in social media because this question will be asked in interviews: What do you do to stay current in social media trends? If you’re only on Facebook,  what is your response going to be when you are competing for a job if the only social media site you use is Facebook?  You have to stand out and being active on Twitter is one way to do that (along with your resumé of course)!

I didn’t know about Twitter and I still don’t have that much knowledge on utilizing Twitter, but I read various novels to educate myself in how to use Twitter more efficiently and what other apps that can be used for your “Twitter” profile that Twitter doesn’t offer. For example, it was required by Nixon for us to read a novel on our major. For that assignment, I chose “Whuffie Factor” (@missrogue )  and then over Christmas break, I read “Twitter Power.” These two novels taught me how to improve my social media skills. I recommend every student to read a novel because another interview question that’s being asked is “what books do you read?”

  

Haiti Media Coverage: Competition or Awareness

January 22, 2010

The destruction of  Haiti due to the earthquake  is speechless.  When this happened, I was watching various news networks to get updated stories about the earthquake. With that being said, I don’t know if the media is exploiting the Haiti Earthquake by reporting personal stories or if they are delivering personal stories to raise awareness on how severe this is.  For example, is Anderson Cooper in Haiti reporting new facts to increase ratings and compete with other news networks or is he there for our sake to increase our awareness by using personal stories?  Is it necessary to know personal stories of various Haitian people and use graphic pictures for competition and to capture the American audience to watch a specific news program or read a specific newspaper? In my opinion, I think all the news programs are doing both competing with one another to increase their ratings and to persuade Americans to help out in any way possible. On the positive side, relief for Haiti has been technology friendly. For example, the International Red Cross is using text messaging for people to give $10 and will show up on people’s cell phone bill. Haiti is receiving faster, quicker relief due to people having more access to social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, and text messaging. As an active member of Facebook and Twitter, I have seen various tweets and status updates on both social media sites for people to help in other ways.  This strategy is genius because we didn’t take advantage of the technology for Hurricane Katrina, which exemplifies how technology has become more advanced within a couple of years.

Darfur Diaries: This Is Not a Nightmare, it’s Reality

October 19, 2009

 Chills ran through my body as I watched the documentary film on Darfur and using my knowledge from my International Studies course along with International Public Relations.  The conflict began  when there was an increase in citizens, farmers, and herders due to the large land.  In 2003, 40, 000 civilians died while there are estimated 2 million people are in refugee camps.  This film featured people who have been separated from their family and leaving all of their belongings.  These victims  are full of life and are proud of their heritage and culture. The Janjaweed, which is the  allied militias that are made up of Arab milita, have destroyed the villages in Darfur, raped women of all ages, and  have murdered civilians. In retaliation,  the SLA (Sudanese Liberation Army) was formed in 2003.  According to some of the victims, the “policy of the government is the problem. They are punishing the innocent and as aresult, the innocent are suffering mental problems. We want our freedom and peace. We formed the SLA to fight against the government for survival.”  The people in the film also felt that the government has humiliated and degraded them.  When the children were asked to draw pictures of what is happening in Darfur, they drew detailed pictures of the  Janjaweed buring their homes, killing their families, and brutally destroying all of what they worked hard for that has been in the family for many generations.  One main character who captured my heart is Ibrahim Yousef who is ten. His dad was murdered and his mother is with him in the refugee camp.  Yousef drew a picture of the Janjaweed (Sudanese Government)  bombing villages. “They came to our village to kill people.”  This film was created by three people to capture global attention since the media refused to discuss this prevalent issue. The children have dreams about the genocide, which is evidence on how big of an issue this is. One victim said that this genocide would never happen in America because we have nations that help us and are a strong country.Imagine you are not being heard by America and you were forced by the government to leave your home that you worked hard to establish leaving behind your possessions and your family is separated; some family members are killed for no reason and others you don’t know if they are alive. Day by day, you wait for this constant battle to end so you can return to your home. What would you do? I think of these children each  day and this issue should be brought to global attention.I’m amazed at how much spirit the children have despite their struggle.

<a href=’\”>’ >Darfur Genocide: A Present Reality